Browsing: Holodomor

NEW YORK – Ukraine’s Holodomor, the 1932-1933 genocide by famine of 7-10 million Ukrainians committed by Joseph Stalin, ranks among the worst cases of man’s inhumanity towards man. In memory of the innocent victims of this Soviet genocide, 3 million of whom were children, the Ukrainian Congress Committee of America (UCCA), annually co-organizes an ecumenical commemoration at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City on the third Saturday of November, which regularly attracts thousands of attendees from across the tri-state metropolitan area.

This year, the organizers of the annual event advise our community not to travel to St. Patrick’s Cathedral on November 21. Case reporting of COVID-19 continues to spread in New York City, with increases in recent hospitalizations concerning local authorities enough to begin limiting non-essential gatherings in certain neighborhoods. On November 15, the UCCA encouraged the public to instead watch the livestream from St. Patrick’s Cathedral to mark the 87th anniversary of the Holodomor.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

TORONTO – HREC Education, of the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium (HREC), a project of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, announced that its national panel of education adjudicators has selected the winners of this year’s HREC Educator Award for Holodomor Lesson Plan Development. Presented annually to recognize outstanding educators in the field of Holodomor teaching, the award fosters excellence in the development of innovative, creative and interactive lessons for grades K-12 that develop students’ critical thinking skills while addressing the topic of the genocide in Ukraine in the early 1930s.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

WASHINGTON – The National Council of Social Studies (NCSS) partnered with the U.S. Committee for Ukrainian Holodomor-Genocide Awareness to host a national webinar on September 17 on the Ukrainian Holodomor titled “Stalin’s Cover-Up of the Ukrainian Famine Genocide, 1932-1933: The Original Fake News.”

Speakers in the webinar were Doris Duzyj of Michigan, Dr. Christopher Mauriello of Massachusetts and Michael Sawkiw Jr. of Washington.

The webinar began with a PowerPoint presentation by Ms. Duzyj explaining the vulnerability of Ukraine’s geographic location, its history of dominance by numerous empires and subsequent suffering, and persecution under Stalin’s regime. Statistical data about population losses was reviewed from the Harvard MAPA project.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

WASHINGTON – For nearly fifteen years, the U.S. Committee for Ukrainian Holodomor-Genocide Awareness (U.S. Holodomor Committee) has worked diligently to raise the awareness of the American public about one of the least known tragedies in the world – the 1932-1933 Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, or Holodomor. The quintessential accomplishment was the dedication of the Holodomor Memorial in Washington on November 7, 2015, attended by Ukraine’s First Lady Maryna Poroshenko, hierarchs of the Ukrainian Catholic and Ukrainian Orthodox Churches, members of Congress, and thousands of community activists from throughout the country.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

MINEAPOLIS – For the second consecutive year, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS) at the University of Minnesota partnered with the Ukrainian American Community Center (UACC) in Minneapolis to educate teachers and the public about the Holodomor. “This valued partnership provides the UACC with a platform to raise awareness and promote Holodomor recognition,” stated Luda Anastazievsky, UACC programming director, who leads the  center’s outreach and education efforts.

In August 2019, CHGS had invited the Ukrainian center to present at a summer workshop for middle and high school teachers from the Twin Cities and around the country. This week-long educator for educators provided an introduction to the legal and social concepts of genocide, as well as historical and contemporary examples of genocide, including the Holocaust and the genocides in Armenia, Bosnia, Cambodia and Ukraine.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

WASHINGTON – The University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation began a five-month exhibition and associated events focusing on the process of creating a public U.S. memorial and, in particular, the work of one of its prominent graduates: the designer, architect and sculptor of the National Holodomor Memorial in our nation’s capital – Larysa Kurylas.

The Holodomor was Stalin’s infamous Famine-Genocide that killed at least 4 million Ukrainians in 1932-1933.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

MONTREAL – The Montreal restoration project of Holodomor resource material for educators and the general public, undertaken by Yurij Luhovy and Zorianna Hrycenko, provides additional resource materials on the Holodomor.

Filmed in 1983, the final two phases of a major three-part project which began in May 2018 and was completed by January 2020, has now been posted online. The Holodomor project, which commemorated the 50th anniversary of the 1932-1933 Great Famine in Soviet Ukraine, leaves an important record of the work done in the diaspora to safeguard historical memory for future generations.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

MINNEAPOLIS – Ukrainian community members recently gathered at the University of Minnesota for a reception marking the official transfer of materials from a recently completed oral history project, titled “Holodomor Impact on Minnesota’s Ukrainian Community,” to the institution’s Immigration History Research Center Archives (IHRCA). The event took place on November 20, 2019.
Professionally recorded video files and written, annotated transcripts of 11 interviews with Holodomor survivors, and children and grandchildren of survivors, will be permanently housed at the IHRCA, located at the University’s Elmer L. Andersen Library.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

Below is the text of remarks delivered by Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) on November 16 at the Holodomor commemoration at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York.

Good afternoon, everyone. It’s an honor and a privilege to be here with you.
I’d like to thank Andriy Futey, Tamara Olexy and the Ukrainian Congress Committee of America for organizing this meaningful remembrance.
I also want to recognize the Ukrainian ambassador to the United Nations, Volo­dy­myr Yelchenko, and the consul general, Oleksii Holubov, for being here with us today.
And if you can see close-up, I’m wearing yellow and blue in honor of the Ukrainian flag. May it wave forever!

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

The following statement was made by U.S. State Department spokesperson Morgan Ortagus on November 23.

This November we honor and remember the millions of Ukrainians who perished 86 years ago during Holodomor, the catastrophic famine created by the barbaric policies of the Stalin regime.
Through the deliberate seizure of Ukrainian land and crops and forced collectivization, the Soviet Union caused widespread starvation and death and immeasurable human suffering.
While this horrific tragedy was one of the most atrocious of the 20th century, the Soviet Union could not break the spirit of the Ukrainian people.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

COHOES, N.Y. – Members of the Ukrainian community of New York’s Capital District gathered on Saturday, November 16, to commemorate the victims of the Holodomor.
At 10 a.m., braving 20 degree temperature and a blustering wind chill, participants observed the Holodomor’s 86th anniversary with solemnity and reverence.
The program opened with the laying of a wreath at the Cohoes Holodomor Memorial located in a small meditation park, followed by the singing of the U.S. national anthem by Iryna Petryk.
Dr. Andrij Baran, chairman of the New York Capital District Holodomor Committee, then spoke about the “The History and Meaning of Holodomor,” reminding all why we were there. This was followed by a moment of silence.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.

HARTFORD, Conn. – The Hartford branch of the Ukrainian Congress Committee of America organized the annual bus trip to the New York City Holodomor memorial service at St Patrick Cathedral on Saturday, November 16. Shown here are the students from St. Michael Ukrainian School of Hartford before the services.

Please register below for a FREE account.
The subscription will be updated and be live from the date of registration.

Login Subscribe Now
Create an account or log in to continue reading.